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It's the Law

 

Curfew
There are penalties and fines for curfew violation. Standard curfews for those under 17 are as follow:

St. Louis City Curfew:
Friday - Saturday: 1:00A.M. - 5:00A.M.
Sunday - Thursday: 11:00P.M. - 5:00A.M.

St. Louis County Curfew:
Friday - Saturday: 12:00A.M. - 5:00A.M.
Sunday - Thursday: 11:00P.M. - 5:00A.M.


St. Charles City Curfew:
Friday - Saturday: 12:00A.M. - 5:00A.M.
Sunday - Thursday: 11:00P.M. - 5:00A.M.

Missouri’s “Zero Tolerance” Law
Missouri’s “ZERO TOLERANCE” law took effect August 28, 1996. Zero Tolerance makes it illegal for anyone under age 21 to drink and then drive a vehicle even if they have consumed just a small amount of alcohol.

How Does Zero Tolerance Work?
When a police officer stops you, if s/he thinks you have been drinking, s/he may ask you to take some tests like walking heel to toe or standing on one leg. These tests will help the officer decide if you should have a chemical test of your breath, blood or urine. The result of the chemical test is known as your Blood Alcohol Content (BAC) level.

The Zero Tolerance law says that if you are under age 21, the first time you are stopped and your Blood Alcohol Content (BAC) level is at or between .020% and .099%, you will have to give your license to the police officer on the spot and it will be suspended for 30 days. For 60 days after your suspension, you will only be allowed to drive to and from work and alcohol education classes. If you are stopped for the same thing later, you will lose your license for one year. Also, if an officer takes your license for a zero tolerance offense, you will have to attend an alcohol education class in order to get your license back.

Is Zero Tolerance Missouri’s Only Drinking and Driving Law?
No! Zero Tolerance is a new law in addition to Missouri's Driving While Intoxicated (DWI) law.

What is Missouri’s DWI law?
If your BAC level is .08% or above, you will be charged with DWI and may be booked into jail or a juvenile detention center. Not only will your license be suspended for 30 days, followed by a 60 day restricted driving privilege, but you will also be criminally charged; this includes court appearances, an 8 point violation on your driver’s license, alcohol education classes known as SATOP, providing proof of insurance, thousands of dollars in fines, increased insurance premiums, attorney fees, and criminal records, and possible jail time. You should also know that even if you test below .10% or refuse a test, you may still be charged with an alcohol-related offense.

Whom does the DWI Law affect?
EVERYONE - This law applies to ALL ages.

Missouri’s New “Fake Id” Law
It is against the law to reproduce, modify, or alter a motor vehicle driver’s license or to possess one, which has been reproduced, modified or altered. Missouri State Statute 311.329
Source: Brochure-”IF YOU'VE HAD IT (alcohol), WE GET IT! (driver's license) GOT IT?” From Missouri Division of Highway Safety 1-800-800-BELT in partnership with Division of Motor Vehicle and Drivers Licensing 573-751-4833

Purchase and Possession of Alcohol and Tobacco
The average age at which teens start drinking is 13 years. Purchase or possession of alcohol by a person under age 21 is illegal. Possession or sale of street drugs or controlled substances, including drugs prescribed for another person, is illegal.

Any person who sells or furnishes alcoholic beverages to someone under age 21 could be subject to a fine of up to $1,000 and/or imprisonment for up to one year. These penalties apply if a property owner allows minors to consume alcohol or other drugs on or in his/her property. Any owner, occupant, or other person with a lawful right to the use and enjoyment of any property who knowingly allows any person under 21 to consume alcohol on their property or who knowingly fails to stop a minor from drinking on their property shall be guilty of a misdemeanor. Homeowners can be found liable for the subsequent consequences of such minors driving after consuming alcohol on their property.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         It is unlawful to have an open container of alcohol in an automobile. The average age at which teens start using tobacco is 12 years. It is illegal to sell tobacco products to a minor (under 18) and illegal for a minor to purchase them.

Minor in Possession (MIP) by Consumption
A new law in Missouri, effective August 28th, 2005 states that if the police find you visibly intoxicated or you have a detectable Blood Alcohol Concentration (BAC) of .02 and you are under 21, they can charge you with “minor in possession (MIP) by consumption”. This means that even if you are not holding the alcohol container, but have consumed alcohol, you can be charged with an MIP. A misdemeanor may be on your record for life if you are convicted or plead guilty. If you do have a misdemeanor on your record, you could be responsible for revealing this information on job applications and applications for many colleges and advanced degree programs (such as medical school and law school). Yes, it is a big deal.

Any owner, occupant, or other person with a lawful right to the use and enjoyment of any property who knowingly allows any person under 21 to consume alcohol on their property or who knowingly fails to stop a minor from drinking on their property shall be guilty of a misdemeanor. Homeowners can be found liable for the subsequent consequences of such minors driving after consuming alcohol on their property.